❅ 12 Days of Christmas - The World’s Most Difficult Quiz Vols 1 & 2 - £5 each ❅

Posted on December 09, 2015 by Anthony Cond

Think you can beat The World’s Most Difficult Quiz? Think you could beat both volumes? In our next 12 Days of Christmas Event you can give it your best try. 

The World’s Most Difficult Quiz
The King William's College General Knowledge Papers Vol. 1
Pat Cullen
£9.99 £5 with code QUIZ5

For 50 years Guardian readers have been stumped by the fiendishly difficult General Knowledge Paper set annually at Christmas for the pupils of King William’s College, on the Isle of Man. Here, for the first time, is a compendium of the GKP questions and answers from 1981 to 2010 with a special bespoke set of questions compiled for the book by quizmaster Dr Pat Cullen. Guaranteed to challenge even the most ardent enthusiast, this book can genuinely claim to contain the world’s most difficult quiz.

Devised for intellectual torture.
  The Guardian

Arguably the most difficult set of questions in the world.
  The Guardian

The World’s Most Difficult Quiz 2
The King William's College General Knowledge Papers Vol. 1
Pat Cullen
£9.99 £5 with code QUIZ5

Who made an enemy of two ladies through an apple? Why did Tar Baby keep on sayin' nothin'? Which royal residence is built on thirteen thousand piles? Following the best-selling book The World's Most Difficult Quiz comes this sequel which collects the most taxing questions from early King William's College General Knowledge papers published in the Guardian over many years. Again the book includes a new and devilishly difficult set of questions prepared especially for publication by quizmaster Pat Cullen. A challenge for the most erudite of minds, The World's Most Difficult Quiz 2 is the ultimate general knowledge challenge.

Dr Cullen is to be commended for reproducing these sections in their entirety, in the name of historical interest; and it's because of this that I might go so far as to say that this book is, actually, even more valuable and entertaining than its predecessor.
Nicholas Lezard, The Guardian

 

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