How to get the most out of Kudos: For authors

Posted on May 17, 2017 by Megan Ainsworth

What is Kudos?

Kudos is a web-based service that aims to help increase the visibility and impact of research and build academic reputations. It is free for researchers.

How does Kudos increase the impact of your research?

Your research has been published and with the aim of increasing readership, you have shared or promoted it across various online channels; how can you be sure what works?

Kudos is designed to be a central independent system from which to manage communications for your publications wherever you publish and/or whichever “channel’ you use to communicate, bringing together different metrics to understand which actions are driving results. 

 

“Kudos is designed to be a central independent system…bringing together metrics to  understand which actions are driving  results.”

 

What do you need to do as an author?

There are 3 simple steps towards increasing the impact of your research; explain, share and measure.

Step 1:

Claim and explain your article. Once registered with Kudos (you can use your ORCID if you have one) you will be able to find your publication and ‘claim’ it. Explain your article by adding a plain language summary to make it more discoverable - which means more usage and more citations. For example if your title is long with a narrow focus, plain language impact statements make articles appeal more to other researchers in different fields, increasing the reach of the article. Tip: Use language that will be comprehensible to non-academics or researchers in other fields.

At this stage, you can add links to related resources that help to bring your work to life, set it in context, or drive further research (code, methods, data, slides, video, press coverage, blog postings etc.).

By explaining and enriching your article, you are making it easier for:

  • People using non-specialist terms to find otherwise “hidden” works - increasing cross-disciplinary readership and citations.
  • People within your field to skim and scan more publications.
  • People in adjacent fields to understand the relevance of your work to what they are doing.
  • People outside academia to get a handle on research and apply it in non-academic ways.
  • Non-English speakers – ensuring your work has impact globally.

Step 2:

Share your article. You have enriched your article by adding a plain language summary and related resources, and you are ready to share your work across different social channels.  Kudos generates ‘trackable’ links for you to share via your email, web and social networks. This gives you a unique insight into which tools/channels are most effective. On average, authors who make use of Kudos’ sharing tools receive 23% higher downloads of their work.

 

“Trackable links give you a unique insight into which tools/channels are most effective”

 

Step 3:

Measure the impact of your activity through comprehensive personalised metrics. The personal metrics dashboard in Kudos allows you to see all your claimed article metrics together on one page on My Dashboard – which can be accessed under the My Tools drop-down menu.

Minimal effort, great results…

On average, it takes just 15 minutes to complete these 3 simple steps; a very acceptable duration of time to increase usage and citations.

If you have recently had an article published in a Liverpool University Press journal, you can register with Kudos and begin using the service immediately, completely free of charge.

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Town Planning Review 88.3: Featured Article

Posted on May 17, 2017 by Megan Ainsworth

The editors of TPR have selected 'The character of the Just City: the regulation of place distinctiveness and its unjust social effects' by Gethin Davison as the Featured Article for the latest issue. It will be free to access for three months. You can access the article here.

When asked to describe the paper, and highlight its importance, the author stated the following:

One of the most important tasks of planning research is to scrutinise and question the norms, assumptions and values that underpin planning practice. To that end, this article casts a critical light on an area of planning practice that is widespread, long-standing and largely unquestioned: the regulation of place distinctiveness through notions of neighbourhood, or community, ‘character’.

Drawing on the methods of Critical Discourse Analysis, the article examines planning texts in Melbourne, Australia, a city where the concept of character is unusually central to planning decision-making. Not only does the analysis reveal some inherent difficulties in the regulation of character, it demonstrates that such practices can also justify highly inequitable and exclusionary planning outcomes.

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The 'truth' behind Atlantis - Christopher Gill on Plato's Atlantis Story

Posted on May 05, 2017 by Heather Gallagher

Christopher Gill, author of Plato's Atlantis Story, discusses the philosophical significance of Plato's compelling Atlantis story and how the mythical city has captured our imagination throughout time. 

 

Could you give us an overview of Plato’s Atlantis Story?

First of all, it’s not just the story of Atlantis. That is the famous name, but it’s actually a tale of two cities. It’s the story of Atlantis and Athens, two long-ago cities in Greece, and both of them are set in an idealised past. It’s about the character of the two cities, especially the contrast between them, which is a contrast in constitution, structure and character. The story describes each of them separately and leads up to a future war which is never actually described, a war which leads to the defeat of Atlantis – and that is something that is often glossed over in people’s idea of Atlantis. Ancient Athens wins and Atlantis is defeated.

 

What is the philosophical meaning of the story?

To get the philosophical meaning, it’s useful to think about the relationship between the Atlantis story and other major Platonic works of philosophy. There is an explicit link to the Republic in that the philosophical meaning of this story is a political one. We have the equivalent of the ideal state of the Republic set in ancient Athens and we have a kind of counter-ideal in Atlantis. The focus, in both cases, is on their structure or constitution, which is what Plato’s Republic is also about. Political structure is important and gives rise to events – and this is part of the philosophical significance of the story.

You get another indication of the philosophical significance if you think about the relationship to the Timaeus, the story of the creation of the universe – both stories are put side by side in this text. Both stories, in different ways, place human life in the context of the cosmos, and this greatly expands the perspective that you have on the city as a political community. In the Atlantis story, we find a massive expansion of time, space, and geography; we go out to the far west and we go far back in time. The story invites us to place the city in this much broader perspective. Also, the description of the city is very much centred on its physical context, showing the city in its material and environmental context, just as the creation story is an account of human beings being formed within the universe as a physical entity.

These themes, the political theme and the theme of the universe, are expressions of the more general idea of making the ideal into something concrete, physical and actual. The two cities are specific expressions of the ideal and the un-ideal political community and Atlantis functions as a foil or contrast to the ideal.

 

What is the significance of Plato’s presentation?

This volume brings out the significance of the use of dialogue and the interplay between characters. The dialogue between the figures (Socrates and the other characters) frames the story, which forms part of their conversation. Plato in other writings uses dialogue form and tells stories (his ‘myths’). But this story is quite unique in Plato, offering a quasi-historical description of two cities, going back far beyond Plato’s own time. It is very vividly presented, with highly specific and graphic presentation of both the cities, their geography, topography and the physical expression of their political life. Of course, that’s what has captured people’s imagination over time. The description reflects the 4th/5th century Athens of Plato’s personal experience whilst also creating an idealised past.

Also, Plato presents the account in such a way that the theme of truth runs through the story. It poses the question, implicitly: what is truth? Critias insists that his story is true and accurate but it looks suspiciously unlike a true story, and more like a philosophical fable. The story starts like a myth, so it is puzzling when it is described as true. Running through the conversation between the characters is this interplay between truth as fact and truth as ideas. This interplay feeds back into the core philosophical point in the story about making the ideal into something actual. It’s difficult to work out when the story is set, whether it is real or not, whether it could have been real. There is a  slightly surreal quality to it all, which helps to unsettle our notion of truth and makes us raise profound questions, which is Plato’s ultimate aim in the story.

 

Why do you think people are still drawn to Plato? What makes him so significant?

The reason why we’re drawn to Plato is because he is an absolutely brilliant, world-class philosopher. It’s like being drawn to the Bible or Shakespeare or Darwin. The ideas are still philosophically powerful for us. But also, I think Plato also still attracts because he’s a wonderful writer. He is bold, his conceptions capture people’s minds and imagination. He combines philosophical and literary brilliance. It’s that combination of the philosopher and the author that makes him still continually compelling to us.

The story-telling is key in this text, people return to again and again because it seems so vivid that people almost feel it must be true. It’s so wonderfully told, and with such richness of detail, that it has driven people over time to actually look for Atlantis even though it absolutely isn’t there.

 

What do you think will make this book useful to students?

There are two kinds of readers who will find it really useful. One is Platonic scholars or philosophy scholars in general; they will appreciate the fact that it is comprehensive, with the text, the commentary, the translation and vocabulary brought together in a compact format. There’s a very long and in-depth and new interpretive essay which builds on previous scholarship on the work. So the book has a definite appeal at the academic level.

But there’s also something for everyone because some can just use the translation, and others can make use of the book as a whole. It is especially directed at students, people studying Greek at university or school. It is a very practical text, in a number of ways. This is partly because it’s comprehensive, but also because it gives a lot of help with the grammar and translation, help that students need to work their way through this text. There is a detailed grammatical commentary and a full vocabulary of Greek words, as well as a new translation of the text. Alongside this, the unusual presentation of the text in bite-sized chunks of notes and commentary makes the content more digestible. This book is practical, engaging and designed to provide what modern students need.

 

For more information on Plato's Atlantis Story please visit our website.

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Comma is available to institutional non-members of the ICA

Posted on April 28, 2017 by Megan Ainsworth

Liverpool University Press is pleased to announce that Comma, the journal of the International Council on Archives, is available to institutional non-members of the ICA for the first time. 

Comma, International Journal on Archives is the chief serial publication of the International Council on Archives. Comma strives to be of value to a broader readership beyond the ICA membership and the archival profession at large. Content of the journal includes congress and conference proceedings, reports and studies from ICA bodies (branches and sections) and special thematic issues. The common focus of each issue is the research, administration, and development of archives and the archival profession on a worldwide basis.

Comma is distributed worldwide for Liverpool University Press by Turpin Distribution. For ordering information contact: Liverpool@turpin-distribution.com
Tel: +44 (0) 1767 604977 or Order or renew a Comma subscription online.

For more information please visit our website: http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/loi/coma

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'My Dark Horses' an interview with Jodie Hollander

Posted on April 28, 2017 by Heather Gallagher
To celebrate the release of her latest collection, Sophie Hewitt is in conversation with Jodie Hollander, delving into the influences and inspiration behind My Dark Horses. Read on for a poem from Jodie's collection, entitled 'A Box', and see where you can catch her UK readings this May.

My Dark Horses

 

Can you tell us how you came to choose My Dark Horses as the title for your collection?

Anyone familiar with my work knows that my poetry isn’t afraid to face darkness and dysfunction. When I wrote the poem, My Dark Horses, it instantly felt like I hit upon a theme central to the collection, so it wasn’t long after that I wanted to make it the title poem. I love the symbolism that the title portrays, and I feel that it prepares the reader for what’s to come.

 

Many of your poems have the subtitle of After Rimbaud. What is the significance of this?

During a wonderful residency in France, I started working on new book of poems that engage with and respond to Rimbaud’s collection, Illuminations. My translation of certain lines in Rimbaud’s work inspired a whole new series of ideas for me. At first, I thought this work would be part of a separate collection, but I found the ideas were grappling with similar themes as the poems in My Dark Horses. As I look at them now, I’m pleased with the different aesthetic that they bring to the book. I still hope to compile a collection made up exclusively of Rimbaud response poems.

 

Many of the poems contain references to classical music, whether it’s about classical instruments or specific pieces. How much of an influence has classical music had on your poetry? Do you think that music in important in writing poetry?

Music was everywhere during my childhood. My mother, father, sister and brother are all professional classical musicians, and a typical dinner conversation usually centered on the Bach Double Concerto, or the final movement of a Paganini piece. All three of us children were required to take classical music lessons. While my sister and brother quickly emerged as virtuoso talents, I found myself working twice as hard yet progressing at half their speed – so I convinced my parents to let me quit music lessons. This was a huge relief, but being the only non-musician in the family meant I was often left out of family discussions and music-centered events. I don’t think any of this was purposeful on the part of my family, they were all just infatuated with classical music, and I had other interests. Looking back on it now, I think this time was really when my poetic sensibility began to develop. I spent a lot of time alone, taking long walks or lying under the piano and observing the family practice sessions. These early observations stayed imprinted in my mind and later found their way into my poems.

To your second question, Duke Ellington said it best: “it don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing.” I think music is the single most important element in writing good poems. In my mind, poetry exists somewhere in between music and prose. Good poetry is pleasing to the ear, and therefore, the music is part of the meaning of the poem. This is also why I love reading metrical poetry, and why I’m working on mastering the craft myself. Without music, I feel that a poem is just prose organized in a different way.

 

Family appears to be the main theme running throughout the collection. What has drawn you to write about family in your poetry?

So much happened to me during my childhood, that I felt I had a story that needed to be told. That being said, I don’t think we necessarily get to choose our subject matter. If I did have a choice I’d probably write about climate change or some hot political topic. Instead, I write about what’s on offer – what comes to me. I’m hoping that my next book will be about something different, but for me, the muse must approve.

 

Your poems confront difficult issues such as grief and loss but have been described as containing a ‘tough humour’ (Brackenbury). Why did you decide to include this underlying humour in many of your poems?

As Shakespeare and many other great artists have taught us, life is a mixture of both tragedy and comedy. I think the best works of art in any medium find a way to embrace both of these conditions. In my own poems, I often see the irony or even hypocrisy in many of the situations I describe, and sometimes that can be expressed through a kind of humour. I wish more contemporary poetry used humour, as I feel it’s a wonderful quality in poetry; it offsets some of the darkness, and really deepens the experience of the poem.

  

Below is 'The Box' from Jodie Hollander's latest collection My Dark Horses

 

A Box

 

All those years

of trying to understand

which of this is her,

which of this is me?

Getting at the truth

was always so confusing

amidst her craziness;

how to separate?

And though the shrink said

Put her in a box

I never quite could

 

until that Saturday

when the doorbell rang:

and there stood a man

thin and bedraggled,

dripping in the rain.

He held a clipboard,

a small warped box,

containing my mother

or rather her remains.

Sign here, he said,

and handed me the box.

 

Funny how this came

surprisingly unbidden,

though I’ve often wondered

if in a weak moment

I didn’t wish for this.

But now that it’s here

what am I to do

except to hold it close,

feel its roughness

up against my cheek,

smell that terrible smell

of factory cardboard

now finally between us.

 

Jodie Hollander

Jodie Hollander was raised in a family of classical musicians. Her work has appeared in publications such as The Poetry Review, The Dark Horse, The Rialto, Verse Daily, The Warwick Review, The Manchester Review, Australia’s Best Poems, 2011, and Australia’s Best Poems of 2015. Her debut pamphlet, The Humane Society, was released with Tall-Lighthouse in 2012. She is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship in South Africa, and was awarded a MacDowell Colony fellowship in 2015.

 

You can find Jodie at the following events around the UK this May:

May 9: Pavilion Poetry Book Launch and reading with Nuar Alsadir and Marilyn Hacker
May 10: Reading and presentation at the Liverpool Athenaeum
May 11: Reading at York Central Library with Nuar Alasdir and Ruby Robinson
May 13: Reading at The Bookcase, Hebden Bridge Yorkshire
May 16: Reading at Albion Beatnik Bookstore, Oxford with Ben Parker and Harry Man
May 17: Lunchtime Reading at Oxford Brookes University, Oxford with Jane Spiro
May 18: Daunt Books, Cheapside, London with Sarah Westcott and Susan Wicks
May 21: Torriano Meeting House, London with Sarah Westcott and Sarah Corbett
May 23: CB1 Poetry, CB2 Cafe, Cambridge Reading with Sarah Howe
May 24: Pighog Poetry Reading, Nightingale Room, Brighton
May 25: Words and Ears, Swan Hotel, Bradford on Avon
May 26: Reading at Keats House, Hampstead, London
May 28: Reading at Octavo’s Books, Cardiff with Christina Thatcher

 

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