Child Welfare and Social Action from the Nineteenth Century to the Present

BookChild Welfare and Social Action from the Nineteenth Century to the Present

Child Welfare and Social Action from the Nineteenth Century to the Present

2001

October 1st, 2001

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This collection of twelve essays represents an important contribution to the understanding of child welfare and social action in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They challenge many assumptions about the history of childhood and child welfare policy and cover a variety of themes including the physical and sexual abuse of children, forced child migration and role of the welfare state.

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Section TitlePagePrice
Title Page3
Contents5
Acknowledgements7
Introduction: Child Welfare and Social Action9
I: Gender and ‘Delinquency’21
1: Deserting Daughters: Runaways and the Red-Light District of Montreal before 194523
2: ‘Just Trying to be Men’? Violence, Girls and their Social Worlds44
II: Child Emigration59
3: Fairbridge Child Migrants61
4: Gender, Generations and Social Class: The Fairbridge Society and British Child Migration to Canada, 1930-196090
5: Child Rescue: The Emigration of an Idea109
6: Changing Childhoods: Child Emigration since 1945129
III: Rethinking Philanthropy153
7: From Barrack Schools to Family Cottages: Creating Domestic Space for Late Victorian Poor Children155
8: The Campaign for School Meals in Edwardian Scotland182
9: ‘Blood is Thicker than Water’: Family, Fantasy and Identity in the Lives of Scottish Foster Children203
IV: ‘Welfare States’ and Child Welfare225
10: ‘Fixing’ Mothers: Child Welfare and Compulsory Sterilisation in the American Midwest, 1925-1945227
11: A Spirit of ‘Friendly Rivalry’? Voluntary Societies and the Formation of Post-War Child Welfare Legislation in Britain242
12: Mental Incapacity, Ill-Health and Poverty: Family Failure in Post-War Britain264
Notes on Contributors285
Index288