Douglas Dunn

BookDouglas Dunn

Douglas Dunn

Writers and Their Work

2006

June 5th, 2006

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Douglas Dunn is one of the most widely-read and respected poets of his generation. In a career spanning over 30 years, he has refined lyric and elegiac poetry into an instrument with which to make acute observations of English urban scenes, pastoral traditions, class and education, and the past, present and future of his native Scotland. In this lucid and wide-ranging critical study, poet and critic David Kennedy charts Dunn’s career from his debut volume Terry Street (1969) to his New Selected Poems 1964-2000 (2003). He argues that Dunn’s poetry has developed through often highly ambivalent relationships with form, culture and the public identity and role of the poet. Subtle readings of Dunn’s most intimate poetry are combined with careful analysis of Dunn’s exploration of what form Scotland’s national consciousness might take. Dunn emerges as a complex writer passionately concerned with both the private and the political.

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Author Information

Dr David Kennedy is a poet, critic, editor and teacher and an independent scholar specialising in contemporary poetry in English. He teaches creative writing (poetry) at several HE institutions and is a Royal Literary Fund Advisory Fellow mentoring six new Fellows each year. He is a regular reviewer for PN Review, Poetry Wales, London Magazine and Poetry Review and his several publications include New Relations: The Refashioning of British Poetry 1980-1994 (1996), as co-editor, The New Poetry (1993) and as poet The President of Earth: New and Selected Poems 1987-2001 (2002)

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Section TitlePagePrice
Cover 1
Half Title 2
Title Page4
Copyright5
Dedication6
Contents8
Acknowledgements9
Biographical Outline10
Abbreviations and References15
Introduction18
1 Part of a Place26
2 Realisms, Rhapsodies and Responsibilities39
3 Gestures of Affront54
4 Innermost Dialects72
5 Decencies, Disenchantments and Diversity87
Notes98
Bibliography103
Index107