International Development Planning Review

The resurgence of national development planning: how did we get back here?

International Development Planning Review (2020), 42, (2), 127–138.

Abstract

After decades in the political and ideological wilderness, national development planning has made a comeback. The number of countries with a national development plan has doubled since 2006. Given that national development planning has always served various interests and ideologies and that it has always had both political and technical aspects, this article asks, ‘how did we get back here?’. This article uncovers the pathways that countries have taken back to national development planning, and outline the various motivations for re-embarking on national development planning. In many cases, an earlier generation of liberal economic policies created both the need and the political space for a new generation of national planning. We explore how the complex interplay of external and internal forces led back to national planning in different types of settings.

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References

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Best, J. (2014) Governing failure, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Google Scholar

Blitzer, C. R., Clark, P. B. and Taylor, L. (eds) (1975) Economy-wide models and development planning, New York, Oxford University Press. Google Scholar

Chimhowu, A., Hulme, D. and Munro, L. T. (2019) ‘The “new” national development planning and global development goals: processes and partnerships’, World Development, 120, 76–89. Google Scholar

Hayek, F. (1944) The road to serfdom, Chicago, University of Chicago Press. Google Scholar

Healey, P. (1992) ‘Planning through debate: the communicative turn in planning theory’, Town Planning Review, 63(2), 143–62. Google Scholar

Hsiu-Fang H. and Shannon, S. E. (2005) ‘Three approaches to qualitative content analysis’, Qualitative Health Research, 15(9), 1277–88. Google Scholar

Hulme, D. (2007) ‘A brief history of the world’s biggest promise’ (BWPI Working Paper 100), Manchester, Brooks World Poverty Institute. Google Scholar

IMF (2016) Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP), IMF, http://www.imf.org/external/np/prsp/prsp.aspx (accessed 10 January 2019). Google Scholar

Johnson, J. and Barnes, A. (2014) ‘Financial nationalism and its international enablers: the Hungarian experience’, Review of International Political Economy, 22(3), 535–69. Google Scholar

Kim Jong Un (2017) ‘New Year address’, The National Committee of North Korea, https://www.ncnk.org/resources/publications/kju_2017_new_years_address.pdf/file_view (accessed 10 January 2019). Google Scholar

Levy, B. and Fukuyama, F. (2010) Development strategies: integrating governance and growth, Washington, DC, World Bank. Google Scholar

Lopes, C. (2013) ‘50 years of development planning in Africa: lessons and challenges’, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, https://www.uneca.org/es-blog/50-years-development-planning-africa-%E2%8o%93-lessons-and-challenges (accessed 10 January 2019). Google Scholar

Moser, C. O. (2014) ‘Gender planning and development: revisiting, deconstructing and reflecting’ (Working paper 165/60), London, Development Planning Unit. Google Scholar

Munro, L. T. (2017) ‘Strategies to shape the international order: exit, voice and innovation versus expulsion, maintenance and absorption’, Canadian Journal of Development Studies, 39(2), 310–28 Google Scholar

OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) (2006) Good practices in the national sustainable development strategies of OECD countries, Paris, OECD. Google Scholar

OECD/UNDP (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/United Nations Development Programme) (2016) Making development co-operation more effective: 2016 progress report, Paris, OECD. Google Scholar

Pender, J. (2001) ‘From “structural adjustment” to “comprehensive development framework”: conditionality transformed?’, Third World Quarterly, 22(3), 397–411. Google Scholar

Rodrik, D. (2007) ‘The inescapable trilemma of the world economy’, 27 June, Dani Rodrik’s weblog, http://rodrik.typepad.com/dani_rodriks_weblog/2007/06/the-inescapable.html (accessed 10 January 2019). Google Scholar

Swanson, D. and Khotamov, Z. (2015) Final report: workshop on national development strategies and plans, Incheon, UN Office for Sustainable Development. Google Scholar

UNDESA (United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs) (2006) Report on the workshop on national sustainable development strategies in Pacific Island developing states, New York, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Google Scholar

UNDESA (United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs) (2015) Report of the expert group meeting on integrated approaches to sustainable development planning and implementation, New York, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Google Scholar

UNECA (United Nations Economic Commission for Africa) (2011) National strategies for sustainable development in Africa: a sixteen-country assessment, Addis Ababa, UN Economic Commission for Africa. Google Scholar

UNECA (United Nations Economic Commission for Africa) (2016) Planning for Africa’s development: lessons, insights and messages from past and present experiences, Addis Ababa, UN Economic Commission for Africa. Google Scholar

Watson, A. and Dirlam, J. (1965) ‘The impact of underdevelopment on economic planning’, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 79(2), 167–94. Google Scholar

Wolfensohn, J. (2000) ‘Remarks on the comprehensive development framework’, Hanoi, 23 February, World Bank, http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/418091468197088670/Remarks-on-the-comprehensive-development-framework-by-James-D-Wolfensohn-President. Google Scholar

World Bank (2000) Comprehensive development framework: country experience: March 1999–July 2000, Washington, DC, World Bank. Google Scholar

World Bank (2007) Results-based national development strategies: assessment and challenges ahead, Washington, DC, World Bank. Google Scholar

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Details

Author details

Munro, Lauchlan T.