Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies

Zip Zip My Brain Harts

Disability, Photography and Auto/Biography

Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies (2015), 9, (3), 265–276.

Abstract

The article offers analysis of an unusual, collaboratively authored visual book that experiments with ways of bringing the intensely personal, often medicalized experiences of parenting an intellectually disabled child into the sphere of public art. Zip Zip My Brain Harts is a multidisciplinary project that grapples with the ethics of looking and representation. Published in South Africa in 2006, the book consists of photography by Angela Buckland alongside academic essays written by Kathleen McDougall, Leslie Swartz, and Amelia van der Merwe that, collectively, seek to make the everyday lives of people with disabilities and their families “more visible and accessible to us all” (Buckland et al. ix). The argument in the article is that Buckland’s photography employs complex and powerful visual strategies for reconfiguring the ways in which time and auto/biographies are represented beyond linear narrative models.

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Author details

Hall, Alice