Labour History: A Journal of Labour and Social History

Ideology or Expediency? The Abolition of the Queensland Legislative Council 1915-22

Labour History: A Journal of Labour and Social History (2000), 79, (1), 162–178.

Abstract

At one time or another, every state branch of the Australian Labor Party has been committed to abolishing its parliamentary upper house. The party universally - and correctly - regarded these chambers as having been deliberately created by Imperial officials to inhibit the growth of genuine democracy in the colonies. Queensland alone succeeded in eradicating its Legislative Council in 1921. But its achievement was no triumph of democratic socialism. Rather, Labor attained the constitutional means to abolish well before acquiring the political will to proceed. In all probability, abolition occurred only when it became apparent that retention - even with a Labor majority - was potentially disruptive of the party’s internal workings.

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Author details

Harding, Justin

Table of Contents

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