Labour History

Clyde Cameron: An Architect of “The Great Labor Schism”

Labour History (2018), 115, (1), 47–66.

Abstract

South Australian Labor MHR Clyde Cameron had a huge impact on the fortunes of the Australian Labor Party in the post-war period. When he died in 2008, he was most remembered as having been a “numbers man” of the 1950s and 1960s who had done more than any other, excepting Whitlam himself, to secure a victory for that party at the watershed federal elections in December 1972. Yet Cameron figured just as decisively, albeit less conspicuously, in the Labor split of the mid-1950s that did much to consign the Party to opposition at the federal level for more than a generation. Cameron’s commitment to the ALP’s socialisation objective and his antipathy toward those anti-communists who were either hostile or just indifferent to it compelled him to oppose The Movement and the industrial groups, from the mid-1940s in South Australia and thereafter in all states. His commitment to what he saw as Labor’s most cherished goal never wavered, even when the party to which he had devoted his life turned against it in the mid and late 1980s.

Access Token
£25.00
READ THIS ARTICLE
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here

Details

Author details

Saunders, Malcolm